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It’s Elemental: New Homeowner’s Basic Maintenance Guide

October 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

It's Elemental: New Homeowner's Basic Maintenance Guide

Buying a home is an exciting experience. You save up your downpayment, wade through thousands of listings, find and hire a buyer’s agent, search for the perfect home, make and offer, get accepted and take the plunge. Now, you’ve moved in, repainted walls, arranged furniture, hung window coverings and settled in for the fall season.

Except, you’ve never checked a furnace filter, dealt with a leaky faucet, cleaned gutters or mulched your trees. If you’ve never owned a home before, you may be unprepared for the realities of home ownership.

What to do?

Remember the four elements:

  • Earth
  • Air
  • Fire
  • Water

Earth: While the temperatures remain warm enough, take care of any landscaping issues you may have. Rake and properly dispose of leaves, remove dead branches, give your lawn a final mowing and prepare it for winter, mulch flowerbeds and trees, cover any exposed dirt to protect it from erosion and check rock walls for loose stones.

Inspect your foundation for cracks that may need professional repair.

While you’re at it, put away outdoor furniture, toys and tools so that they’re protected from harsh winter weather and ready for Spring.

Air: One of the most important elements in your home, air, can be a friend or an enemy. Seal windows and add weather-stripping to doors for leakage. Check the attic insulation for the appropriate depth for your region. Inspect your attic fans, gable vents and other air-flow methods for proper ventilation.

Winterize your AC. Remove or winterize your window air conditioners. Wash off the condenser housing of your central AC and remove any buildup of leaves, dust, insect nests, weeds or grass clippings. Have a professional check your central air-conditioning system for leaks.

Fire: Your HVAC system (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) keeps your home comfortable in all temperatures, so take care of it well. Make sure filters are clean and free of damage. Have your furnace inspected by a certified HVAC technician. Check your ducts check for buildup and have the professionally cleaned if necessary.

Make sure the fireplace damper works correctly so that you can avoid losing warmth through the flue and check the chimney for debris from insects, birds or prior use.

Check smoke and gas detectors to make certain the batteries are new and the  alarms work.

Water: This element causes hidden damage in homes and requires vigilance to keep from having massive problems and expensive repairs due to mildew, mold, rot and other water damages. Outdoors, inspect your gutters and downspouts for leaves and debris. Make sure the downspouts are directed away from your foundation. Have your roof inspected to make certain you don’t have potential leaks. This is particularly true after a major weather event such has hail or heavy wind. A professional roof inspector can also advise you on weather your home might be subject to ice damage from dams and buildup.

Check your faucets for drips and your drains for leaks. Make sure pipes hidden in cupboards do not leak or create condensation. If you have condensation inside cabinets from water pipes you may need to install ventilation into the cabinets. Check toilets for leaking, running or flow problems and have them fixed immediately.

When to do it?

Check out this list scheduled by seasons to see the best times to take care of your home maintenance issues.

Contact your real estate professional for information on home inspections before you buy so that you’re prepared for the upkeep to your new investment.

Compliments of Virtual Results

Back-to-School Organization

August 25, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Back-to-School OrganizationWith school starting, it’s time to do a little reorganizing to make early mornings and after-school activities run smoothly. When starting school after moving to a new home, consider some of the additional challenges your children face and plan accordingly. Implement changes to the household gradually so that your kids adjust before that big first day!

Bedtime

Over the summer, kids typically wake later in the morning and fall asleep later in the evening. To ease the adjustment, begin walking back the bedtime hours until you reach the optimum time at least a few days before the start of school. To help in the transition, install blackout curtains in bedrooms and avoid blue light from television, computer, tablet and phone screens.

Breakfast and Lunch

Stock your refrigerator with quick, nutritious options for breakfast and to-go lunches. Choose health-conscious options that your kids like and have them help you pack their lunch the night before school.

Clothing

If your children wear uniforms, having several options so that you don’t have to launder them at night during the week is helpful. Have children pick out their clothes the night before. Create a special space in their closets just for school clothes so you can tell at a glance if you need to replenish their wardrobe before the weekend.

Shoes

Creating a shoe station at the door saves time on hunting for that lost shoe and keeps wet, dirty or muddy prints from tracking through the house. Consider a separate shoe cubby for each child and hang hooks above each cubby for jackets and backpacks. If your child plays sports, create a separate cubby for uniforms, equipment and sports shoes.

After-School Snacks

Set up an afterschool snack station in a basket or decorative bin on your counter and a specific shelf in your refrigerator for juice, sports drinks and veggies or fruit.

Homework

Create a homework station. For younger children, a specific space off the kitchen or living area keeps supplies and assignments contained and organized. Set up organizer boxes for each child to place assignments and set a calendar and bulletin board above the station to keep track of due dates, after-school activities and special events.

Older kids benefit from having a desk or study area in their rooms or a quieter office space, but a calendar on the outside of the door lets you keep track of their schedule while offering them some privacy.

Preparing For the Big Day

Starting a new school in a new neighborhood requires advance preparation. If your child walks to school, take the time to go over several routes to and from school. Learn where crossing guards assist on busy streets and where sidewalks offer safety as they walk to and from school. Locate bike lanes and the safest biking routes from your home. Locate bus stops and learn the correct bus numbers.

If you’re looking for a home in a specific school district or need information about your neighborhood schools, check with your local real estate professional for up-to-date statistics and data.

Compliments of Virtual Results

Landscape for Your Climate

July 23, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Landscape for Your ClimateVisions of lush green lawns, English gardens bursting with color and a sparkling fountain filling the air with the tinkling of thousands of water drops may float through your head when dreaming of your ideal home. But, you’re responsible, so you’ve planned for your new home to be efficient: changing outdated toilets for modern low-flow versions, installed sustainable bamboo flooring, energy-efficient windows and natural gas appliances and even added extra insulation. So your yard, naturally, should be just as ecologically sustainable.

Plan to replace that voraciously thirsty lawn with a beautiful, low-maintenance dry-scape. Dry-scaping (also called desert-scaping, or xeriscaping) is landscaping that uses less water, protects local wildlife and conserves energy while naturally fitting in with the regional environment. Since most climates support a wide variety of plant life, you’ll want to be sure to choose native plants. Before tearing up the existing lawn, however, consider the ways you’ll use the outdoor spaces, the slope and lay of the land and the effort you want to put into maintaining it.

Carefully plan your site

Take time to determine how wind, sun, shade and water naturally factor into your property. Hire a professional to test the soil. When property slopes even a slightly, water naturally flows differently than on a flat elevation. You’ll want to place play or entertainment areas at a higher point so that water doesn’t pool in them. Use a lower area for a water feature or for plants that would benefit from the runoff.

Conserve water and soil

A professional landscaper or local gardening shop can offer the perfect plants to conserve water and soil. When plants require added water, install a drip-irrigation system that slowly adds water directly to the plant. a drip-irrigation system reduces waste as compared to sprinklers. Drip systems also prevent both evaporation and overwatering. Be sure to preserve any natural existing trees, but replace high-maintenance ones with quick-growing climate positive varietals. Install shade-tolerant plants in the shadow of trees. Consider replacing lawn with heavier ground cover (larger gravel, lava rock, or native plants) to reduce water consumption and protect from erosion.

Create a functional space

Because lawns offer activity and play area, carefully use materials and designs to enhance the usefulness of your landscape. If you replace turf grasses with pea gravel for a play area—or even mulch, sand, or recycled materials designed especially to use in playgrounds your children’s area can be both easily maintained and functional.

Design your entertainment areas with gravel and paver stones in artful combination to beautiful and protect from erosion while requiring less water. Check out these images for some great ideas.

Contemplate alternative materials

Enhance natural landscaping materials like mulch and gravel by using alternatives such as recycled concrete and brick for rock garden and retaining walls, re-purposed rubber tires for playground areas, and tumbled glass “mulch” to add color to raised flower beds and garden walkways.

Consider maintenance needs

No matter what landscape options you choose, if your yard becomes a haven for weeds or requires lots of effort, its use and your pleasure in it are diminished.

  • Check local requirements for herbicides that work best and are safe for the local environment.
  • Cover bare soil with water permeable barriers or fabric. Layer your gravel or mulch over the fabric making sure it is completely covered.
  • Set timers on irrigation systems.

Compliments of Virtual Results

Slash Your Energy Bill

July 16, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Slash Your Energy Bill

We don’t think about our heating bill much in the summer, but this is the time to make some upgrades to your home that will see you through the winter, such as adding insulation, changing out windows for double or triple panes with low U-factors and repairing any leaks and drafts.

If energy-efficiency is at the very top of your list, however, consider a home with passive construction.

Passive building

The concept of passive building comprises specific construction principles designed to give measurable energy efficiency. There are five main principles that, using building science, offer the highest options for energy efficiency in both single-family and multi-family homes.

Scientists and builders developed the original design principles in the 1970s with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy and the Canadian government. In the 1980s, German scientists added to that information to develop passive principles for homes in the northern European climates.

The principles are:

  1. Insulation: the construction utilizes continuous insulation throughout the building’s envelope (its weather barrier, air barrier and thermal barrier).
  2. The envelope is airtight, so it prevents outside air from entering and inside “conditioned” air from seeping out.
  3. It utilizes high-performance windows (typically triple-paned) and doors.
  4. It utilizes some form of heat- and moisture-recovery ventilation and a minimal-space air conditioning system.
  5. It exploits the sun’s energy for heating purposes, but minimizes it’s impact for cooling purposes.

The super-tight insulation and design strategy balances heat emissions (from appliances and the home’s occupants) to keep the indoor temperature comfortable throughout all seasons. Continuous mechanical filtration keeps the air quality fresh and comfort. The combination of insulation and consistent low-level filtration prevents mold and mildew from establishing inside the home, making this construction-type perfect for allergy-prone family members.

Passive house certification is stringent and means the home has high R-value insulation with up to 90 percent less energy required for heat, and overall 60 to 70 percent less energy overall compared to a regular code-built home.

Flat-paneled rooftop solar systems heat the water typically to between 100 and 140 degrees, even on cloudy days. A small electrical system works as a backup if there are an unusual number of cloudy days. Some passive homes include wood heat for the very coldest days in winter.

Other features of passive building include metal roofing which, in snowy climates allows the snow to slide off, and covered porches and patios to allow for outdoor living spaces and to protect the home’s entrances from snow buildup in inclement weather.

Compliments of Virtual Results

Options for an Upside Down Home

October 18, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

By , About.com Guide

Dealing with an upside down homeis sometimes postponed or ignored completely by home owners. After all, if one can afford to make the payments, one might not much care whether the home is upside down until something traumatic happens. Maybe a person loses his job or a family suddenly needs to move. That’s when the huge mortgage balance on that upside down home begins to matter.

Or, maybe a seller simply gets tired of waiting for appreciation to turn the upside down home right side up again. Home appreciation is not really like the stock market. Certainly not today. The days of wild swings are pretty much over. If your home is upside down, it could take another 10 years or more to turnaround values.

http://homebuying.about.com/b/2012/10/08/options-for-an-upside-down-home.htm?nl=1

How to Overcome Home Buying Obstacles When Buying Your First Home

October 17, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

By , About.com Guide

It’s not always an easy process to buy a home. Many home buyers encounter obstacles, and it’s not unusual to run into flying monkeys and wicked witches along that yellow brick road to home ownership. The first step in home buying is to prepare for the obstacles.

An experienced real estate agent can help you to find the right home, determine how much to pay and negotiate the offer for you. Moreover, an agent can guide you every step of the way throughout the home buying process. But that doesn’t mean you won’t encounter stumbling blocks or obstacles.

Home Buying Obstacle #1: Finding a Down Payment

Unless you’re independently wealthy or just won the lottery, you will probably need to get a mortgage. Only VA loans, available to veterans, let a buyer put down zero. All other loans require a down payment. The two most popular types of mortgages are FHA loansand conventional loans, which require minimum down payments ranging from 3.5% to 10% of the sales price.

Home Buying Obstacle #2: Obtaining a Minimum FICO Score

The two magical numbers are 620 for FHA and 720 for conventional loans with mortgage insurance. If your FICOscore falls below that number, you may not qualify for those mortgages. For conventional loans without mortgage insurance, your FICO can dip as low as 620, but the pricing is ugly.

To find out your FICO score, you should ask your lender to run your credit report. You can obtain a FICO score online, but it will cost you, and it most likely will differ from the score your lender obtains. Your lender will pull your credit scores from 3 credit reporting agencies and take the middle FICO score.

Home Buying Obstacle #3: Meeting Lender Ratios

Most lenders expect a buyer to have a maximum 33% front-end ratio. This means your mortgage payment, plus taxes and insurance (PITI), cannot exceed 33% of your monthly gross income. If you earn $5,000 a month, the maximum PITI payment for which you may qualify is $1,650.

The back-end ratio is trickier. This involves adding together your PITI payment with all monthly revolving debt payments. That percentage of your gross monthly income should fall between 41% and 50%, depending on the type of loan and lender. With mortgage insurance, your highest back-end ratio cannot exceed 41%, which means to qualify for a higher back-end ratio, you may need to put down at least 20%.

Home Buying Obstacle #4: Receiving an Appraisal at Value

The Home Valuation Code of Conduct, HVCC, became effective May 1, 2009, and applies to all conventional transactions. Since January 1, 2010, it now applies to FHA transactions as well. It’s a well meaning process that is flawed.

In the past, a lender could select its own appraiser. That appraiser was generally experienced, knew the neighborhood and had appraised many homes in specific areas, which typically would result in a fair and balanced appraisal. Now, appraisal management companies pluck an appraiser at random from a pool of appraisers. Your appraiser could be from another area or unfamiliar with the neighborhood, which often results in a low appraisal.

If the appraisal does not come in at value, and if the seller refuses to adjust the price, buyers with an appraisal contingency can either walk away from the transaction or pay the difference in cash.

Home Buying Obstacle #5: Satisfying Loan Conditions

Underwriting can be frightening. An underwriterreviews the file and can make demands. These demands can include more documentation, a review appraisal and, even then, the underwriter could reject the loan for a variety of reasons.

If you have remarried, for example, and your former spouse had owned a home that went through foreclosure or a short sale, if your name was still on the mortgage, you could be disqualified from buying a home with your new spouse. The way to increase the odds of underwriting approval is to disclose everything about yourself and your financials to your lender, and make sure the loan officer has been in the business long enough to foresee future problems before you get that far.

http://homebuying.about.com/od/buyingahome/qt/Home-Buying-Obstacles.htm

Loan Locks – When is the Best Time to Lock a Loan?

September 28, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

By , About.com Guide

When it comes to locking the interest rate on a mortgage loan, everybody wants to time it to get the best deal. There’s nothing wrong with that sentiment. It’s normal. Some of the time you’ll get lucky and some of the time you won’t. In other words, it’s a roll of the dice. With a locked interest rate, however, you are guaranteed that if interest rates go up by the time you are ready to close, you will pay the lower interest rate.

What are the risks if the loan is not locked?

Let’s say you decide to wait. You’ve narrowed down where you will get a mortgageand looked at all your loan choices. Maybe you’ve even decided on the loan product you want. But the market is moving down. The Fed has cut rates twice and you expect them to drop further. So you decide not to lock.

It’s a gamble. But if rates go up, you have absolutely no protection. You’re going to pay the higher rate.

What are the main elements to loan locks?

When deciding to lock a loan, there are 3 points to consider:

  • Interest rate
  • Points
  • Length of the lock period

Borrowers will pay extra for an extended loan lock. It’s not free. The interest rate will be a bit higher or the points will reflect the loan lock fee. That’s because the lender is taking on the risk that rates could go up while the transaction is processed, so the lender could end up losing money if the loan is funded at a lower-than-market interest rate. But locking the loan gives the borrower peace of mind. Real estate experts recommend that borrowers lock.

Are you committed to that loan if you lock?

Locking in the rate does not mean the borrower is wedded to that lender. The borrower is actually free to go elsewhere for a loan if the rates go down by the time the transaction is ready to close. Most borrowers don’t realize this little known fact. That’s because lenders don’t want to tell anybody. They don’t want to lose a loan by encouraging a borrower to jump ship.

But if rates go down, and the borrower threatens to pull the loan, to go to another lender, generally the lender will renegotiate the interest rate. Why would the lender do this? Because the lender wants to keep its customers.

How are loan-lock rates figured?

A 30-day rate lock might cost the borrower one-half of a point; whereas a 60-day rate lock might cost one full point. These fees are not paid up front; they are paid at closing. So if the loan never closes because the borrower has changed her mind or gone elsewhere, the fees are never paid. If a borrower doesn’t want to pay for the loan lock through points, the fee can be computed into the interest rate.

Is there a downside?

There is rarely a reason not to lock a loan. Interest rates change daily, sometimes hourly. To protect yourself against the volatility of the marketplace, it’s a good idea to lock your rate once you are satisfied with the rate. The reason some buyers dislike loan locks is because they want to grind every dime out of a transaction that is humanely possible. Just remember that if the rate was acceptable when it was locked three weeks ago, a drop of an 1/8 of a point or so isn’t the end of the world. You don’t need to be that kind of borrower to get a good deal.

http://homebuying.about.com/od/financingadvice/qt/LoanLock.htm

SOLD! 2159 Island Shore Way-San Marcos, CA 92078 (Represented the Buyer)

September 28, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Happy to announce that 2159 Island Shore Way-San Marcos, CA 92078 has closed escrow.  I hope my Buyers are happy with their new purchase!

Welcome home to this stunning five bedroom, three full bathroom home in the gated Rancho Dorado community of La Fuente.  With over 2550 square feet of well-appointed space, you will love the spacious and open feel of this elegant and clean home.  Downstairs, enjoy the convenience of a full bedroom and bathroom (complete with walk-in shower), making it the perfect retreat for visiting guests.  See supplement for more details on this incredible home.

Should I Fix Up My Home or Try to Sell As Is?

September 27, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

By , About.com Guide

Question: Should I Fix Up My Home or Try to Sell As Is?
A reader asks: I’ve spent a lot of time and money doing exterior remodeling of my home, plus a sizeable remodel of the master bath. However, the rest of my 22-year-old home needs attention inside. The bath upstairs has dry rot and is dated. The kitchen, likewise, is dated. We have fairly new appliances, but the counters and cabinets probably need replacing. Should I fix up my home or try to sell it as is?
Answer: This is one of those questions where the answer depends on variables such as condition of competing inventory, whether it’s a hot, cold or neutral real estate marketand the likelihood of return on investment.

Selling a Home in As Is Condition

For example, a few years ago, a past client called to say her next-door neighbors needed to immediately sell their home. To say it needed work was an understatement.

The home appeared inhabitable. It had holes in the walls all the way to the exterior and urine-soaked wood floors; most of the electrical didn’t work and the bathroom tub had fallen through the joists. All the faucets leaked and, in one bedroom, I found a pile of dead rats swept into a pile in the center of the floor.

This was not a home that could be easily fixed up. Not even a coat of paint would have helped sell this place. We priced it low enough that it attracted multiple offersand sold with zero days on market. Only contractors and flippers made offers on this home.

Do Home Buyers Want Fixers or Fixed Up Homes?

Some home buyers want to buy a fixer upperhome, but generally these buyers want a home that will require light cosmetic repairs. Buyers who gravitate toward fixers are those who either don’t qualify to buy a more expensive home or those who want to make a profit by fixing the home themselves.

I’ve yet to meet a novice first-time home buyer who says, “Give me a home I can tear down to the studs.” Most fixer buyers are willing to do simple repairs such as paint the walls, put in new carpeting or replace light fixtures. They typically don’t want to rebuild a foundation or move walls.

Fixer-upper buyers will discount the price of the home to allow for the repairs and, for the inconvenience, a bit more. Say, a home is worth $100,000 fixed up, but it needs a new roof. A new roof might cost $10,000. A buyer most likely will not offer $90,000 for this home. Otherwise, they could buy an identical home with a new roof for $100,000 and not have the hassle.

A buyer for this type of home might offer $75,000, or even less. In this scenario, a seller would be smarter to pay for a new roof and sell the home for $100,000.

Moreover, many buyers will not buy a home that needs a new roof. They will worry the work involved will cost more than what they anticipated. Perhaps replacing the roof would involve tearing off the sheathing and repairing rafters, which could add to the cost. Most buyers want a home that is in move-in condition. By not making repairs, you will limit the number of buyers who may be attracted to your home.

Before Fixing Up Your Home

Smart sellers will weigh the cost of proposed improvements against the home’s market value after the repairs or upgrades are completed. If an upgrade won’t return the investment, such an improvement might not be warranted. Before you decide to lift the roof and install skylights in the master suite, realize that kitchens and baths carry the highest return.

Before deciding to make specific repairs before resale, take an afternoon off to tour other homes in the neighborhood. Note the condition and amenities in those homes. Compare these homes to yours. If, for example, most of the homes on the market have upgraded kitchens, you should concentrate on fixing the kitchen.

This doesn’t mean you need to buy designer appliances and tear out the cabinets. But a minor kitchen remodel might be a good investment. Sometimes, a fresh coat of paint on the cabinets and new hardware can give your kitchen an all-new look.

Make a list of everything that is defective, broken or worn out. If buyers spot problems or malfunctioning systems, they might wonder what else in the home has been neglected. Buyers to whom I showed a $1.5 million-dollar home in the Fab 40s in Sacramento passed on that home due to the sellers’ slight oversight. The entry way rug had a big rip down the center of its seam, and it was ragged. That rug made a bad impression on the buyers to such an extent that they were convinced the sellers didn’t care about selling their home.

Here are 10 minimum improvements to make before selling your home:

  • Patch all holes and cracks in walls and ceilings.
  • Fix all broken appliances and HVAC systems.
  • Repair leaky faucets.
  • Replace worn carpeting.
  • Repaint dark or marred walls with neutral paint (not white).
  • Replace broken windows.
  • Repair the roof.
  • Change out dated light fixtures / ceiling fans.
  • Replace old linens / window coverings.
  • Fix code violations.

If your real estate market is extremely hot — a seller’s market — you can get away with fewer fix-ups before selling; however, a home that needs repairs will still deliver a lower price. In slow markets — a buyer’s market — buyers might not even look at a home that needs work, unless it’s an REO.

http://homebuying.about.com/od/sellingahouse/f/090308_Fix_AsIs.htm

October 2012 San Diego Calendar of Events

September 27, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

The Haunted Hotel     Sept. 21-Oct. 31
Do you dare to step into a darkened basement where eerie sounds and ghosts abound and where spiders and creepy creatures try to reach out to touch anything alive? Brokers Building basement (424 Market St.) (619) 231-0131 / www.hauntedhotel.com

The Haunted Trail     Sept. 28-Oct. 31
A Haunted Forest in the darkness of night is beckoning for you to come and walk upon its trail. Walk amid eerie sounds and strange smells and lurking shadows and where red eyes glow in the dark and creepy fingers reach out for you! Balboa Park. (619) 231-0131 / www.hauntedtrail.net

Scream Zone     Sept. 28-Oct. 31
The Haunted Hayride is a one-of-a-kind attraction where riders huddle together on a tractor-pulled haywagon while stalked by ghosts, zombies and other-worldly creatures! Del Mar Fairgrounds. 858-755-1161 / www.thescreamzone.com

La Mesa Oktoberfest     Oct. 5-7
The smell of bratwurst and other German food, the sound of polka music the refreshing cool beer, and lots of arts, crafts and family activities. Downtown La Mesa on La Mesa Blvd. between Acacia & 4th Ave. www.lamesachamber.net/oktoberfest.php

San Diego Walk Now for Autism Speaks     Oct. 6
Autism is a complex neurobiological disorder that impairs a person’s ability to communicate and relate to others. Proceeds from this 3K walk will go towards further research for autism. 8am-12pm. Liberty Station. (562) 237-4175 / www.walknowforautismspeaks.org

Pacific Beachfest     Oct. 6
There’s entertaining music, professional skateboarding, a fun run, surfing, beach volleyball, and sand dancing. You can shop along the beachfront for crafts, lunch, or beer. The event concludes with a fireworks show over the pier. 11am-7pm. (858) 273-3303 / http://pacificbeachfest.org

FilAmFest     Oct. 6
Filipino traditions and American culture come together to present a fine festival. There’s a variety of musical and costumed performances to entertain you while you visit the Cultural Stage and Art Pavilion. 11am-6pm. Paradise Valley Rd. (504) 390-3271

Oktoberfest by EdUcate     Oct. 6
In addition to a great feast of German food, beer, and music; there are contests, games, dancing, and activities that keep everyone amused all afternoon. 2-7pm. Standley Park lawn area (3585 Governor Dr.) (858) 337-5578 / www.uc-educate.org

Old Town San Diego Art Festival     Oct. 7-8
Over 100 artists are coming to Old Town to present their amazing creations. Enjoy the music and staged entertainment, see a Model T Car Show, and visit the food court and beer garden. 10am-6pm. (619) 233-5008 / www.oldtownartfestival.com

Old Town San Diego Art Festival     Oct. 7-8
Over 100 artists are coming to Old Town to present their amazing creations. Enjoy the music and staged entertainment, see a Model T Car Show, and visit the food court and beer garden. 10am-6pm. (619) 233-5008 / www.oldtownartfestival.com

Polish Festival San Diego     Oct. 12-14
Today’s event is for adults (age 21+). It’s a tribute to Polish culture complete with singing, music, dance performances, food, and spirits. There are Polish souvenirs and Polish food such as sausage, golombkis or bigos. 5-11pm. Pacific Beach. $3. (858) 272-7655 / www.polishmission.org  

La Jolla Art & Wine Festival     Oct. 13-14
An upscale art & wine festival in La Jolla presents art creations from emerging and established artists and delicious tastes of fine wine and beer. Live music stimulates a pleasing atmosphere for patrons to come and enjoy the day. 10am-6pm. Girard Avenue. (858) 349-4769 / www.ljawf.com

La Jolla Art & Wine Festival     Oct. 13-14
An upscale art & wine festival in La Jolla presents art creations from emerging and established artists and delicious tastes of fine wine and beer. Live music stimulates a pleasing atmosphere for patrons to come and enjoy the day. 10am-6pm. Girard Avenue. (858) 349-4769 / www.ljawf.com

La Jolla Art & Wine Festival     Oct. 13-14
An upscale art & wine festival in La Jolla presents art creations from emerging and established artists and delicious tastes of fine wine and beer. Live music stimulates a pleasing atmosphere for patrons to come and enjoy the day. 10am-6pm. Girard Avenue. (858) 349-4769 / www.ljawf.com

Union-Tribune Night & Day Festival     Oct. 13
This adult (age 21+) event features a main stage and a DJ stage; plus food vendors and local businesses and breweries to create an Oktoberfest look and feel. Bring your friends or a date to East Village for a good time. 3pm. (858) 401-0849 / www.utsandiego.com

Union-Tribune Night & Day Festival     Oct. 13
This adult (age 21+) event features a main stage and a DJ stage; plus food vendors and local businesses and breweries to create an Oktoberfest look and feel. Bring your friends or a date to East Village for a good time. 3pm. (858) 401-0849 / www.utsandiego.com

San Diego Healing Arts Festival     Oct. 14
This health fair promotes healthy living alternatives through music, lecture, natural products, herbal remedies, nutrition, and presentations. The Workshop Area offers various meditative arts. 7:30-10pm. Adams Avenue. (619) 546-4806 / www.althealnet.org  

Rancho Penasquitos Recreation Council Oktoberfest     Oct. 19
Come hungry for a feast of German potato salad, bratswurst sausage, red cabbage, sauerkraut, coleslaw, rolls, apple strudel, and spirits from the “Biergarten”. Have fun learning Bavarian folk dances. 6-10pm. Hilltop Community Park (9711 Oviedo Way) (858) 538-8131

Rancho Penasquitos Recreation Council Oktoberfest     Oct. 19
Come hungry for a feast of German potato salad, bratswurst sausage, red cabbage, sauerkraut, coleslaw, rolls, apple strudel, and spirits from the “Biergarten”. Have fun learning Bavarian folk dances. 6-10pm. Hilltop Community Park (9711 Oviedo Way) (858) 538-8131

Rancho Penasquitos Recreation Council Oktoberfest     Oct. 19
Come hungry for a feast of German potato salad, bratswurst sausage, red cabbage, sauerkraut, coleslaw, rolls, apple strudel, and spirits from the “Biergarten”. Have fun learning Bavarian folk dances. 6-10pm. Hilltop Community Park (9711 Oviedo Way) (858) 538-8131

Rancho Penasquitos Recreation Council Oktoberfest     Oct. 19
Come hungry for a feast of German potato salad, bratswurst sausage, red cabbage, sauerkraut, coleslaw, rolls, apple strudel, and spirits from the “Biergarten”. Have fun learning Bavarian folk dances. 6-10pm. Hilltop Community Park (9711 Oviedo Way) (858) 538-8131

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer     Oct. 21
Individuals with a personal commitment to the breast cancer cause are encouraged to form teams and raise pledges that are used for breast cancer research, screenings, and awareness. 7am-1pm. Balboa Park. (619) 682-7422 / www.cancer.org

Making Strides Against Breast Cancer     Oct. 21
Individuals with a personal commitment to the breast cancer cause are encouraged to form teams and raise pledges that are used for breast cancer research, screenings, and awareness. 7am-1pm. Balboa Park. (619) 682-7422 / www.cancer.org

Cardiff Surf Classic & Green Beach Fair    Oct. 27
As in years past, attendees will enjoy a variety of musical entertainment on our solar powered stage, multiple kids activities including two performances from the San Diego Zoo’s Dr. Zoolittle, food vendors and a surf contest. 124 Aberdeen Dr. 760.436.0431 / www.cardiffsurfclassic.com

Cardiff Surf Classic & Green Beach Fair    Oct. 27
As in years past, attendees will enjoy a variety of musical entertainment on our solar powered stage, multiple kids activities including two performances from the San Diego Zoo’s Dr. Zoolittle, food vendors and a surf contest. 124 Aberdeen Dr. 760.436.0431 / www.cardiffsurfclassic.com

Nightmare on Normal Street     Oct. 27
Normal Street has been transformed into an exciting Halloween party for adults (age 21+). You’ll see people mingle about in elaborate costumes and high fashion enjoying music, street dancing, food, and cocktails. 7-10pm. $10/$50 VIP. (619) 692-2077 x-209 / www.thecentersd.org